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Members

The CADE Strategic Plan

The following strategic priorities were approved by the CADE Executive Committee on November 14, 2011.

PRIORITY #1: CADE WILL DEVELOP INITIATIVES THAT SUPPORT ACCESS TO AND SUCCESS IN SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING AND MATHEMATICS DISCIPLINES FOR ALL STUDENTS

Background:  In order to regain the nation’s once-preeminent international position in educational attainment, public, research and land-grant universities should be deeply engaged in the effort to matriculate and graduate populations of Americans who traditionally have been underrepresented at the postsecondary level, particularly in STEM disciplines. There is widespread awareness that there are gaps in the educational achievement in our nation based on race. Unfortunately, there is less awareness of the gender gaps that exist in educational achievement, the unique challenges faced by underrepresented racial minorities (URMs), and the differences in the challenges faced by men and those faced by women.  Given that minorities account for a significant part of the enrollment at member institutions and their importance to the global competitiveness of the nation, CADE will focus on—addressing the issue of low enrollment and graduation rates for underrepresented racial minorities in STEM disciplines with a particular focus on the differences in these challenges by gender.

GOAL:   As we enter phase II of the MMSI, we will continue to focus on the ways we can increase the number of underrepresented minority (URM) males in STEM disciplines. This goal will be achieved through the following objectives:

A.   Build awareness about the challenges faced by URMs in STEM at the undergraduate level.  Funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, CADE and OAAPBU will develop policy briefs that focus on the challenges of URM males by race and the differences in the challenges faced by males as compared to females.

B.   Enhance access and success of URM males by encouraging two- and four-year college collaborations.  Funded by the Kresge Foundation, CADE and OAAPBU will competitively award demonstration grants in the amount of $100,000 to APLU-member institutions who will partner with a community college in an effort to increase the number of URM males transferring into four-year STEM disciplines. These grants will be used as demonstration sites.  The two- and four-year partners will be invited to provide periodic updates about their success and the results will be published on the APLU website and included in A Public Voice, the APLU online newsletter.

C.   Develop an Evidence-based data model for monitoring the success of all students in STEM through the STEM Clusters Conceptual Framework (CF).  Data from the MMSI campus survey developed in Phase I revealed that many institutions do not use disaggregated data to monitor the success of students by race, gender, socio-economic status and academic discipline. OAAPBU will develop the STEM Clusters CF to serve as a framework for institutions of higher education interested in developing data-based practices to increase the success of all students in STEM disciplines. Private funding will be secured to support STEM Clusters on ten APLU campuses as demonstration sites.

PRIORITY #2: CADE WILL DEVELOP INITIATIVES THAT SEEK TO INCREASE THE DIVERSITY OF THE US TEACHING WORKFORCE

Background:  Racial and ethnic minorities, especially African Americans and Hispanics, are underrepresented among the United States teaching profession and pool, and there are huge performance gaps that exist between minority and White teacher candidates on licensure assessments, including Praxis I®. The Praxis I Pre-Professional Skills Tests (PPST®) is used by many teacher education programs as a pre-entry exam to evaluate a student’s mathematics, reading, and writing skills and, in thirty-five states, Praxis exams are required for state teacher licensing.  Although the Educational Testing Service (ETS) and the National Education Association (NEA) have reported that the overall number of racial and ethnic minority teachers in the United States has increased over the past twenty years, a large chasm between the percentages of minority teachers and White teachers in the United States still exists. This chasm becomes more alarming when comparing the percentage of minority teachers working in public schools with the percentage (and projected growth) of minority students enrolled in public schools in America, 17% and 42%, respectively, in 2003-2004. Thus, despite the increase in teacher diversity during the past two decades, there is concern that more needs to be done to increase the relatively low percentage of minority teachers working in public schools.

GOAL: CADE will collaborate with key organizations to identify possible ways to partner with APLU member institutions to increase the diversity of the U.S. teaching workforce.  This goal will be achieved through the following objectives from 2012-2014:

A.   Build awareness about the disparities in performance on teacher certification exams.  OAAPBU will partner with ETS to host a series of panels regarding the disparities in performance on teacher certifications by race.

B.   Develop programs that expose URMs and low-income students to the idea of teaching and the requirements for teaching at the earliest possible opportunity.  In collaboration with the Educational Testing Service, OAAPBU will develop an initiative designed to enhance the readiness of students for teacher certification exams. Additionally, the concept will focus on the curriculum component of teacher preparation programs and the way that Praxis I test materials can be utilized in and outside of the classroom to increase scores.

PRIORITY #3: CADE WILL DEVELOP INITIATIVES TOWARD ENHANCED RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION OF A DIVERSE AND QUALIFIED PROFESSORIATE AT PUBLIC FOUR-YEAR UNIVERSITIES.

Background:  The racial and ethnic demographics of the student population in U.S. higher education has changed in recent years and even more dramatic shifts are projected over the coming decade. Given these projections, it is imperative for higher education administrators to consider ways to recruit, retain and support a more demographically representative professoriate.  Only a proactive and sustained commitment to this issue will adequately address the needs of our increasingly diverse student population. The disparity between the low percentages of faculty members of color and the increasingly diverse student populations and communities at public and research universities raises significant concerns.

GOAL: CADE will disseminate information regarding exemplary practices in recruiting and retaining URM and female faculty.  This goal will be achieved through the following objectives from 2012 through 2014:

A.   Develop policy briefs to address key issues in faculty diversity.  Members of CADE will partner to co-author key policy briefs on areas important to supporting women and faculty of color ion the professoriate including exemplary practices in recruitment, mentoring, etc. 

B.   Sponsor Panel Sessions and Workshops on Exemplary Practices in Developing a diverse professoriate.  CADE will partner with the Council of Presidents and the Council on Academic Affairs to sponsor specific panel workshops during the APLU Annual Meeting and CADE summer meetings

Members in the Spotlight

Featured Project & Initiative

Clemson University
Access & Diversity
The Minority Male in STEM Initiative (MMSI) is designed to increase the recruitment and matriculation of underrepresented minority (URM) males in the STEM disciplines at public universities.