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News & Media

APLU In The News: February 2015

February 28, 2015
By Danielle Douglas-Gabriel
Cleveland State University made a proposition to its students two years ago: Take a full course load of 30 credits a year and get $200 off tuition and a $200 book stipend. Only 32 percent of its undergraduates finished a degree within six years, if at all. Hundreds of students were slipping through the cracks as the cost of college went up and up — and they took on thousands of dollars more in debt.
February 25, 2015
By Nick Anderson
University officials from around the country fear that a key engine of U.S. innovation and economic power is in danger of stalling: federal investment in basic research. The nation needs to spend more, they say, in pursuit of discoveries with unknown and long-term payoffs. Sometimes, they say, lawmakers focus too much on research with short-term goals. The time it takes for basic research to yield a payoff can be 10, 15, or 20 years. That translates to five or 10 congressional elections.
February 24, 2015
By Anne L. Kim
As lawmakers make another effort to pass legislation targeting abusive patent litigation, universities are continuing to let them know they have problems with proposals they think go too far. On Tuesday, more than 140 universities signed a letter to House and Senate Judiciary Committee leaders saying they’re “deeply concerned” that “much of the patent legislation currently being discussed in Congress, including the Innovation Act, H.R. 9, goes well beyond what is needed to address the bad actions of a small number of patent holders, and would instead make it more difficult and expensive for patent holders to defend their rights in good faith.”
February 19, 2015
By Michael Stratford
From the moment President Obama called for a federal college ratings system some 18 months ago, colleges and universities have criticized the idea and lobbied against it.
February 16, 2015
By Chris Parr
The Association of Public and Land Grant Universities wants President Barack Obama's administration to instead embrace a more "practical plan for transparency and accountability reform", describing current proposals - which would see universities rated on tuition fee rates, the amount of debt students accumulate, and the amount of money they are paid post-graduation - as "complex... with numerous technical challenges and near certain inaccuracies".
February 15, 2015
By Chris Parr
The Association of Public and Land Grant Universities wants President Barack Obama's administration to instead embrace a more "practical plan for transparency and accountability reform", describing current proposals - which would see universities rated on tuition fee rates, the amount of debt students accumulate, and the amount of money they are paid post-graduation - as "complex... with numerous technical challenges and near certain inaccuracies".
February 13, 2015
To the delight of many colleges and universities, Senator Lamar Alexander plans to approach the upcoming reauthorization of the Higher Education Act as a gardening activity.
February 12, 2015
The Republican-dominated House education committee just approved legislation, H.R. 5, that is a rewrite of the No Child Left Behind Act with funding levels that critics say are inadequate to properly support K-12 public education. Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), the chairman of the Senate’s education committee, has released draft legislation that has been hit as well by critics who say the funding levels are below the fiscal 2012 pre-sequestration total and would harm efforts to improve student achievement.
February 11, 2015
By Neal Lane
Disunity and dysfunction in Washington should not dissuade physicists from making the case for robust federal funding of science By Neal Lane February 2015 -- Recently, I was invited to share some thoughts about US science policy and research funding at a conference inaugurating Rice University’s Quantum Materials Center. One of the attendees suggested that other researchers might be interested in what I had to say. With that in mind, I offer the following thoughts. They are my own views and do not necessarily represent opinions of any organization or other individuals.
February 9, 2015
By Mark Rosenberg
One of the lessons that I learned as Chancellor of the State University System of Florida (2005-2009) was how to listen better than I had ever listened before. In essence, not to be “tone-deaf.” Throughout this country, there is continuing concern for the shape of things to come in higher education. Our new Provost, Ken Furton, suggests that the changes in higher education will be dramatic, perhaps the most profound that we have ever experienced. Our public urban universities have an unprecedented opportunity to deepen our role and primacy in developing solutions to America’s higher education dilemmas.