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News & Media

APLU In The News: 2016

May 16, 2016
Three agricultural experts from Purdue University have been appointed to a newly created Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities commission to help ensure universal food security by 2050. The commission, called The Challenge of Change: Engaging Public Universities to Feed the World, includes Gebisa Ejeta, distinguished professor of agronomy and the 2009 World Food Prize laureate; Jay Akridge, Glenn W. Sample Dean of Purdue Agriculture; and Vic Lechtenberg, special assistant to the Purdue president and dean emeritus of the College of Agriculture.
May 16, 2016
Drawing on the unique academic, research and leadership capabilities of public research universities, the Assn. of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) convened a new commission, The Challenge of Change: Engaging Public Universities to Feed the World, to address growing domestic and global food security challenges and ensure universal food security by 2050.
May 16, 2016
Top agronomists at Purdue University will be part of a new nationwide higher education task force on food security. The Association of Public and Land Grant Universities is putting together the 31-member commission, which aims to ensure that the world's rapidly growing population has enough to eat.
May 13, 2016
This week a new commission to address world food security began its work. The commission called The Challenge of Change: Engaging Public Universities to Feed the World was appointed by the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities. Jay Akridge, Glenn W. Sample Dean of Purdue Agriculture is one of three appointments from Purdue. He told HAT the commission has the important task of identifying efforts public universities should develop to bring us to a point of global food security by 2050.
May 10, 2016
Hundreds of Cleveland State University students who will receive degrees at commencement on May 14 will not be considered graduates by the federal government. That's because they attended part-time, transferred from another institution or dropped out and returned. The U.S. Department of Education bases a college's graduation rate on how many first-time full-time freshmen receive their degrees within six years.
May 4, 2016
If you’re eliminating a big chunk of the population that you say you’re serving with the scorecard, it’s going to kill the results. It has a huge impact on the scorecard’s effectiveness. There is another scorecard system that has been developed by the Association of Public and Land Grant Universities (APLU) called the Student Achievement Measure (SAM). They take into account that there are mobile students who enroll in multiple institutions or who transfer and then graduate. The traditional way of counting only the graduation rates of first-time, full-time students really doesn’t show the true picture and it can really have an negative representation for some institutions. The SAM tracks student movement across various postsecondary institutions. A link between the the scorecard and SAM would be good because that would give us a more complete picture of how an institution is doing in terms of student success and completion.
May 4, 2016
Recent weeks have brought good news and bad news concerning lab safety. The good news is an extremely useful new report titled A Guide to Implementing a Safety Culture in Our Universities. Both the report and a companion websitewere issued 11 April by the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU), whose members include 25 university systems and 207 universities in the United States, Canada, and Mexico.
April 12, 2016
Presidents and chancellors of U.S. universities must take personal responsibility for changing the lab safety culture in academia, a new report says. The document, published by the Association of Public & Land-Grant Universities (APLU), challenges top university officials to create high-level committees responsible for lab safety, to modify tenure and promotion requirements to include safety, and to promote open commutation about accidents and near-misses on campuses. Although the report contains other recommendations, the ones putting emphasis on university officials’ accountability are being viewed as most important by the report’s authors and other safety experts.
April 11, 2016
Several major associations issued a new report Monday designed to help universities ensure that their research labs and other academic environments operate safely. The report, "A Guide to Implementing a Safety Culture in Our Universities," was produced by a special panel created by the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities, in response to a series of accidents in laboratories and other research sites. The report, to which the Association of American Universities and other groups also contributed, offers recommendations for campus administrators and faculty members.
April 11, 2016
Math is a stumbling block for many students, and instruction may be part of the reason why. Introductory math courses that serve as gateways to majors in science, technology, engineering, and math can be stultifying bores, a presidential council has said, leaving students "with the impression that all STEM fields are dull and unimaginative." The council’s members have even suggested assigning faculty members from physics or computer science, for example, to teach the subject. Meanwhile, according to a recent critique, math curricula overemphasize abstract subjects like trigonometry and calculus over more-practical ones, unnecessarily demoralizing students and costing the nation human potential.