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APLU In The News: March 2018

March 22, 2018
A massive spending bill agreed to by congressional negotiators Wednesday raises the maximum Pell Grant by $175, includes an additional $3 billion for the National Institutes of Health as well as increased funds for the National Science Foundation, and provides $152.8 million for the National Endowment for the Humanities, which President Trump had sought to eliminate. It also includes about $350 million in funding to address eligibility for the Public Service Loan Forgiveness program, a top priority for Senator Elizabeth Warren throughout negotiations to fund the government through the rest of the 2018 fiscal year. That amount is a fraction of what the Massachusetts Democrat had hoped to see in a final spending package. But it’s part of a slate of new funding for college affordability and education programs in the $1.3 trillion omnibus bill, which lawmakers from the House and Senate must pass quickly to avoid another government shutdown Friday night.
March 14, 2018
Student success will be the theme of a new center dedicated to "public university transformation." The Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) has announced a new initiative to bring together a hundred public research universities organized in clusters to identify, refine and scale innovative practices to increase the number of four-year degree holders over the next seven years. The institutions that participate will share key data within the clusters and help to propagate the practices across higher ed.
March 14, 2018
Across the country, scientists are watching with dismay as the months tick by without any appointment of a White House science adviser. The omission is "symbolically worrisome," said one of those researchers, Christopher F. D’Elia, dean of the College of the Coast and Environment at Louisiana State University. "We’d like to see scientists respected, and a scientist as the science adviser." But a less-visible, if arguably more consequential, White House absence is now compounding — or, to some minds, possibly easing — those anxieties in the university research community.