Skip Navigation
/sebin/h/i/page-bg-internal.jpg
/sebin/b/r/page-banner-pillars-UVA.jpg
News & Media

APLU In The News: May 17, 2018

May 17, 2018
University of Texas at San Antonio President Taylor Eighmy has announced numerous initiatives since taking the helm last September. Recently, a series of town hall meetings convened on campus to elicit feedback and elaborate on the long-term vision for one of those initiatives – the UTSA downtown campus. Key aspects of the vision and planning for Downtown UTSA include new buildings for classrooms, offices, dormitories and mixed-used development in order to offer a full curriculum, student housing and a truly robust campus experience. In addition to increasing the student population and ensuring a full-service university facility – in effect, an autonomous campus – Downtown UTSA will establish new schools and institutes. As a first step, a request for proposals addressing the repurposing of Cattleman’s Square should go out this summer.
May 17, 2018
When Donald Trump was elected president in November 2016, the scientific research community braced for the worst. Funding for science research had stalled in the past decade. And on the campaign trail, Trump talked about drastic cuts to federal spending. For scientists, his overall attitude caused concern, such as when he called climate change a "hoax." When he released his budget request in May 2017, it did nothing to alleviate concerns that he'd decimate federal funding for scientific research. Across the nation, universities and researchers cautioned against it. "It was not a positive budget for the future of our country," says Jennifer Poulakidas, vice president for congressional and governmental affairs at the Association of Public Land-grant Universities.
May 17, 2018
Students across the country are walking across the stage this month to accept college diplomas, marking one of the most consequential achievements of their lives. Yet far too many of their peers come agonizingly close to joining them on the podium, only to fall just short of the credits needed to graduate. For some of these students, financial strain has simply knocked them off course. We tend to view financial aid as something that seals the deal for students: with the door of opportunity open, the only thing standing between them and a degree is their drive to complete it. But while financial aid sets students on the path to graduation, even the most determined students can fail to reach the finish line when financial shortfalls arise late in their college career.