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News & Media

APLU In The News

June 18, 2018
Dozens of universities are banding together with a new reporting system to keep tabs on Greek organizations in hopes of curbing hazing, sexual assault and alcohol abuse. Dozens of schools, including Penn State, Florida State and Louisiana State University, are supporting the creation on a scorecard for fraternities and sororities to track things like cumulative GPA, alcohol and hazing violations and chapter suspensions. The goal is to discern patterns, identify bad actors and provide leverage to hold national organizations to account.
June 13, 2018
A coalition of 500 research universities, scientific organizations and businesses released a progress reporttoday on a call for Congress and White House to support and improve innovation. The report praises increased congressional support for research but says more progress must be made. And it finds areas like U.S. visa policy an increasing concern. The release of the report comes three years after the groups called on the federal government to take action to back research and innovation.
June 8, 2018
Proponents for better data on whether and how college pays off for students saw a victory, if a small one, Thursday as the primary lobbying group for private nonprofit colleges inched closer to backing a new federal system that would give important information to students and policy makers.
May 31, 2018
Two higher-education associations released statements on Wednesday opposing the U.S. State Department’s move to limit the length of student visas for some Chinese citizens. The planned directive, as reported by news outlets such as Bloomberg News and The New York Times, means that the time allotted in the United States would be reduced for some Chinese citizens, and would be applied on an individual basis. The changes were part of a White House attempt to combat the alleged theft of American intellectual property by China.
May 31, 2018
Major higher education groups issued statements Wednesday expressing concern about the Trump administration's reported plans to limit the length of visas for certain Chinese citizens starting June 11. The Associated Press reported Tuesday that the administration intends to limit Chinese graduate students studying certain high-tech fields to one-year visas -- instead of the usual five -- due to concerns about intellectual property theft. In 2014, the Obama administration extended the terms for visas for Chinese citizens from one year to five years for students and from one to 10 years for tourists.
May 31, 2018
Changes to U.S. policy on Chinese visas may trickle down to college enrollment, officials warned, and Texas' schools may feel some impact. The Trump administration plans to shorten the length of validity for some visas issued to Chinese citizens, the State Department said Tuesday, as President Donald Trump works to counter alleged theft of U.S. intellectual property by Beijing.
May 21, 2018
A decade after the last comprehensive overhaul of federal higher education law, Congress is again working on a rewrite of the nation’s higher education policy – with legislation that could come to the House floor this year. As our economy continues to produce outsized job growth for positions requiring a college education, it’s more important than ever that federal policy works to expand college access, foster college affordability, and strengthen workforce competitiveness.
May 17, 2018
University of Texas at San Antonio President Taylor Eighmy has announced numerous initiatives since taking the helm last September. Recently, a series of town hall meetings convened on campus to elicit feedback and elaborate on the long-term vision for one of those initiatives – the UTSA downtown campus. Key aspects of the vision and planning for Downtown UTSA include new buildings for classrooms, offices, dormitories and mixed-used development in order to offer a full curriculum, student housing and a truly robust campus experience. In addition to increasing the student population and ensuring a full-service university facility – in effect, an autonomous campus – Downtown UTSA will establish new schools and institutes. As a first step, a request for proposals addressing the repurposing of Cattleman’s Square should go out this summer.
May 17, 2018
When Donald Trump was elected president in November 2016, the scientific research community braced for the worst. Funding for science research had stalled in the past decade. And on the campaign trail, Trump talked about drastic cuts to federal spending. For scientists, his overall attitude caused concern, such as when he called climate change a "hoax." When he released his budget request in May 2017, it did nothing to alleviate concerns that he'd decimate federal funding for scientific research. Across the nation, universities and researchers cautioned against it. "It was not a positive budget for the future of our country," says Jennifer Poulakidas, vice president for congressional and governmental affairs at the Association of Public Land-grant Universities.
May 17, 2018
Students across the country are walking across the stage this month to accept college diplomas, marking one of the most consequential achievements of their lives. Yet far too many of their peers come agonizingly close to joining them on the podium, only to fall just short of the credits needed to graduate. For some of these students, financial strain has simply knocked them off course. We tend to view financial aid as something that seals the deal for students: with the door of opportunity open, the only thing standing between them and a degree is their drive to complete it. But while financial aid sets students on the path to graduation, even the most determined students can fail to reach the finish line when financial shortfalls arise late in their college career.