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News & Media

APLU In The News

November 17, 2017
Even as the number of international students in the United States increased by 3 percent over the prior year, the count for those enrolled at a U.S. institution for the first time in fall 2016 declined by nearly 10,000 students — the first time the "Open Doors" project has seen a drop of those numbers in the 12 years since it began this reporting. At the same time, the Association of Public & Land-Grant Universities (APLU) issued a report to its member institutions, calling on them to show leadership in "internationalization" efforts.
August 11, 2017
American universities are the envy of the world, drawing students from across the world to study in the United States. International students aren’t just pursuing an education here; they want to build a career and life here too. More than anything, they want a chance to chase the American Dream. America’s most prized export shouldn’t be the international students who attend U.S. universities, only to be forced to move home after graduation because a broken immigration system prevents them from driving innovations, building businesses and creating jobs right here in the United States.
July 21, 2017
Twelve higher education associations this week registered “serious concern” about a proposal under consideration at the Department of Homeland Security that would require international students to reapply annually for permission to stay in the U.S.
May 17, 2017
The Challenge of Change Commission, established by the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities (APLU), last year, has released a report identifying solutions for the global food system. The APLU convened the commission to examine challenges to food security and make recommendations on the actions required by public research universities to meet global food needs by 2050. The group is comprised of prominent university, government, non-governmental organizations, and business leaders.
May 5, 2017
A hungry child knows no politics. That’s what President Ronald Reagan declared in 1985 after approving food aid to famine-stricken Ethiopia, where hundreds of thousands were starving. There has been some progress in parts of Africa, but big challenges remain. In February, the United Nations declared famine in parts of South Sudan, where 100,000 people could die of hunger without intervention. In addition to South Sudan, families are teetering on the brink of famine in Nigeria, Somalia and Yemen. Organizations like the World Food Programme are scaling up relief operations to reach the most vulnerable households, but funding shortfalls mean resources aren’t keeping up with the need. People are really facing starvation.
February 23, 2017
Universities played an important role in the unexpectedly widespread mobilization against President Trump’s Jan. 27 executive order suspending entry to the United States from seven Muslim-majority countries. The protests themselves came from many directions, as civil liberties organizations played a key role, while lawyers and activists flocked to airports to provide free assistance to arriving international travelers. While implementation of the order ended after injunctions by multiple courts, the Trump administration has indicated that it plans to issue a new order as soon as this week.
February 7, 2017
Since the Sustainable Development Goals were adopted, higher education professionals have worked across departments and reached across borders to advance the agenda, with universities offering the kind of interdisciplinary expertise needed to solve such complex problems as eradicating poverty in all its forms by 2030. But researchers who rely on the U.S. government for funding say they may now be in the difficult position of having to defend their work and demonstrate their value to an “America first” administration.
February 1, 2017
In response to President Trump’s sweeping executive order on immigration, nearly 50 higher education organizations united Tuesday to urge the secretary of homeland security to ensure that the United States remains an ambition for the brightest students and scholars from around the world. On Friday, Trump signed the order, which began a temporary ban on allowing people from Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen from entering the United States, and suspended admission of refugees for 120 days.
February 1, 2017
“International scholars and students are very important for higher education,” APLU President Peter McPherson said. “Our institutions and our whole country are a very vibrant place in part because we have these very excellent people from around the world.”
January 30, 2017
Peter McPherson, president of the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities, said in an interview Saturday that while the association is hearing stories from member schools about individuals affected by the order, it doesn’t know how many people are unable to return to campuses.