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News & Media

APLU In The News

January 30, 2017
A federal judge blocked part of President Trump’s executive order on immigration on Saturday evening, ordering that refugees and others trapped at airports across the United States should not be sent back to their home countries. But the judge stopped short of letting them into the country or issuing a broader ruling on the constitutionality of Mr. Trump’s actions. Lawyers who sued the government to block the White House order said the decision, which came after an emergency hearing in a New York City courtroom, could affect an estimated 100 to 200 people who were detained upon arrival at American airports in the wake of the order that Mr. Trump signed on Friday afternoon, a week into his presidency.
January 30, 2017
An executive order signed by President Trump late Friday afternoon immediately barring immigrants and nonimmigrant visitors from seven Muslim-majority countries from entering the U.S. has had immediate effects on scholars and students. More than 17,000 students in the U.S. come from the seven countries affected by the immediate 90-day entry ban: Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen.
January 30, 2017
President Trump's executive order Friday that bars all refugees from entering the United States, as well as citizens from seven majority-Muslim countries, prompted colleges to frantically start trying to determine what it meant for them.
January 30, 2017
Peter McPherson, director of the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities, said Trump’s executive order is causing “significant disruption and hardship” to students and scholars at universities like Kansas State.
July 25, 2016
University of South Florida president Judy Genshaft received a national award this week recognizing the university's heightened focus on international studies. Genshaft received the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities 2016 Malone International Leadership Award on Monday for spearheading efforts to grow the USF System's involvement with international initiatives throughout her 16-year tenure as president.
May 16, 2016
Three agricultural experts from Purdue University have been appointed to a newly created Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities commission to help ensure universal food security by 2050. The commission, called The Challenge of Change: Engaging Public Universities to Feed the World, includes Gebisa Ejeta, distinguished professor of agronomy and the 2009 World Food Prize laureate; Jay Akridge, Glenn W. Sample Dean of Purdue Agriculture; and Vic Lechtenberg, special assistant to the Purdue president and dean emeritus of the College of Agriculture.
May 16, 2016
Drawing on the unique academic, research and leadership capabilities of public research universities, the Assn. of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) convened a new commission, The Challenge of Change: Engaging Public Universities to Feed the World, to address growing domestic and global food security challenges and ensure universal food security by 2050.
May 16, 2016
Top agronomists at Purdue University will be part of a new nationwide higher education task force on food security. The Association of Public and Land Grant Universities is putting together the 31-member commission, which aims to ensure that the world's rapidly growing population has enough to eat.
May 13, 2016
This week a new commission to address world food security began its work. The commission called The Challenge of Change: Engaging Public Universities to Feed the World was appointed by the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities. Jay Akridge, Glenn W. Sample Dean of Purdue Agriculture is one of three appointments from Purdue. He told HAT the commission has the important task of identifying efforts public universities should develop to bring us to a point of global food security by 2050.
June 17, 2015
Hunger and food insecurity are problems that are at once global and local. To be sure, relatively affluent nations like the U.S. face far less dire circumstances than do regions of the world like Sub-Saharan Africa.