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News & Media

APLU In The News

February 6, 2017
Several public universities are taking part in a pilot program to provide small-dollar grants to help low-income students complete their degrees. The five-year project is a collaboration of Temple University and the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities, which will use a nearly $4 million grant from the Education Department to examine and build out completion aid programs at up to 10 universities.
November 22, 2016
When it comes to predicting how President-elect Donald J. Trump’s administration will affect America’s schools and universities, education experts say they are struggling to read the tea leaves. “The fundamental issue is that nobody really knows what the Trump administration is about” on education, said Frederick M. Hess, a conservative education policy expert. At a panel discussion in Washington last week, he joked that Mr. Trump’s trademark educational achievement thus far, creating the controversial Trump University, placed him in history alongside another president, Thomas Jefferson, the founder of the University of Virginia.
November 13, 2016
More than ever, a college education is an indispensable qualification for American workers. Since 2008, 99 percent of all new jobs have gone to individuals with at least some college education. Median annual earnings, meanwhile, are $32,000 higher for bachelor’s degree holders than for workers whose highest credential is a high school diploma. Over a lifetime, that average wage premium translates into $1 million in additional earnings. And as technological advances accelerate and our economy grows increasingly sophisticated, a college education will become even more important.
November 4, 2016
Peter McPherson, president of the Association of Public and Land-grant universities, wrote recently in the Los Angeles Times: “Nearly 500 public universities have pledged to collectively increase the number of Americans earning a degree and share best practices that help to move the needle.” That’s an important step forward that deserves the support of the president of the United States.
September 29, 2016
Hillary Clinton announced her new higher education plan this summer with a burst of fanfare, promising to invest $500 billion to eliminate tuition for millions of students at public colleges and universities across the country. The move was an expansion of an earlier, less ambitious proposal, and was seen as a conciliatory gesture to her left-leaning primary opponent, Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont, and his supporters ahead of the Democratic Party’s convention.“We appreciate that Mrs. Clinton understands that states are disinvesting from higher education in their states,” said Peter McPherson, the president of the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities, who expressed approval that a candidate was trying to broaden access to higher education in a bold way. “But her plan at this juncture doesn’t fill out the details.”
August 22, 2016
Although the American public is often told that a college education will consign them to six figures of debt and diminished financial prospects, the truth is that 36% of public four-year university graduates complete their degrees without any debt, the average debt among borrowers is $25,500, and less than 2% graduate with more than $60,000 in debt. Never mind that a bachelor’s degree adds up to $1 million to a worker’s lifetime earnings. Even some college, particularly a two-year degree, adds to lifetime earnings. Nearly 500 public universities have pledged to collectively increase the number of Americans earning a degree and share best practices that help to move the needle. Nearly 500 public universities have pledged to collectively increase the number of Americans earning a degree and share best practices that help to move the needle. Many institutions are using predictive analytics and Web-based advising to help students chart a clear path to graduation. Some are providing retention micro-grants to low-income students – who are often in their senior year and on track to graduate, but at risk of dropping out because they are just a few hundred dollars short on tuition. Other institutions have proved that an advising session at the beginning of a student’s senior year can appreciably increase their chances of graduating.
August 8, 2016
Pointing to $1.2tn in outstanding student debt, she declares a student debt bubble driven by ever-higher tuition fees. Never mind that college student enrolment climbed by 20 per cent between 2005 and 2010, accounting for a large share of the recent increase in student debt. Contrary to her assertion, college graduates are not facing “a lacklustre US labour market” nor are they saddled with “debts they could never repay.” The jobless rate for college graduates is 2.6 per cent and the loan default rate is 1.1 per cent.
July 11, 2016
As a more racially and socioeconomically diverse body of students pursues college in the United States, schools find themselves responding to more requests to stock food pantries and hand out vouchers for supplies at campus bookstores. In addition to food pantries and vouchers, schools are also turning to completion grants to help students who run out of money and other financial-aid options in their last semester or year of school. A separate study from the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities (APLU) found that most of the schools it looked at turned to the grants after they noticed rising dropout rates among students close to graduating.
May 26, 2016
The Obama administration’s new overtime rule, issued last week, is an unwelcome interference to businesses around the U.S. It’s also going to have a negative impact on universities. The White House wanted to wave its magic wand and create higher salaries for many Americans who don’t qualify for overtime pay. Such pronouncements, however, often create unintended consequences. That includes the possibility of higher tuition — an impact that goes against President Barack Obama’s mission to make college more affordable.
May 24, 2016
The Obama administration's new overtime rules could be costly for U.S. colleges and universities, who will now need to pay overtime to some post-doctoral researchers, athletic coaches, admissions counselors and other lower-level salaried employees. The University of Colorado, which employs roughly 30,000 people across the state, is still calculating how expensive the rule-change will be. The new regulations, issued by the U.S. Department of Labor last week, take effect Dec.