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APLU In The News

January 30, 2017
More than 75 professors from Arizona's three state universities have signed a national petition denouncing President Donald Trump's executive order on immigration as discriminatory and detrimental to the country.
December 8, 2016
A House appropriations bill released this week leaves out new funding to restore summer Pell Grants, disappointing advocates who made that item a priority heading into the lame-duck session. The continuing resolution also includes $872 million for the 21st Century Cures Act, including $352 million for the National Institutes of Health Innovation Account. Higher ed groups including the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities and the Association of American Universities praised the passage of the Cures Act for its support of research and innovation.
November 22, 2016
When the Supreme Court handed down its decision in the case Fisher vs. the University of Texas in July, university admissions officers cheered the affirmation of including race and ethnicity as admissions criteria when narrowly tailored to the institution’s mission. Despite the positive decision for affirmative action, however, university leaders are facing another challenge: making sure they have the right diversity practices in place to support the students they admit. Colleges and universities still have plenty of work to do to encourage students to pursue high-needs fields, like STEM and the biomedical sciences, where diversity is urgently needed. In addition, universities continue to struggle with faculty diversity, which studies have shown is important not just for excellence in teaching and research but also for the overall campus climate. All the more reason, then, for us to redouble our efforts in researching and sharing effective practices for improving campus diversity -- and identifying ineffective practices that we should stop.
November 16, 2016
The Association of Public and Land-grant Universities set the theme for its opening keynote discussion here Sunday well before Election Day. The topic: "Balancing Freedom of Expression and Diversity on Campuses." The election results weren't just the elephant in the room for the session, but were more like a herd of elephants stomping through the room. To be sure, many public universities have struggled with these issues for some time, and in particular since 2015's protests by minority students led to widespread discussions of racial incidents on campus and on social media. In many cases, what some students saw as hate speech, university leaders and free speech advocates saw as protected speech. APLU's members are public universities, and the First Amendment is very much a factor in how these institutions can respond.
November 16, 2016
After a week of heightened tension on college campuses, Education Secretary John B. King Jr. on Tuesday urged public university leaders to "respond aggressively" to any cases of racial harassment. The "challenging national moment ... has left many of our students feeling vulnerable," King told a crowd of public university administrators at the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities meeting in Austin. "We’ve got to make sure all of our students feel like our campuses are a place they belong and will feel supported all the way through to graduation. We’ve got to respond aggressively to incidents where that safety is violated and we have to set a tone on all of our campuses that we see diversity as an asset."
November 14, 2016
Austin, TX – The Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) today announced its 2017 Board of Directors. At a ceremony during the association’s 129th Annual Meeting, University of Virginia President Teresa Sullivan became Chair of the Board, taking over for University of Kansas Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little. The Board of Directors provides oversight and direction for APLU’s work and is charged with setting membership and governing policies for the association. Board members work to make public institutions of higher education more effective in delivering high quality and affordable higher education alongside cutting-edge research and robust community and economic engagement.
November 13, 2016
More than ever, a college education is an indispensable qualification for American workers. Since 2008, 99 percent of all new jobs have gone to individuals with at least some college education. Median annual earnings, meanwhile, are $32,000 higher for bachelor’s degree holders than for workers whose highest credential is a high school diploma. Over a lifetime, that average wage premium translates into $1 million in additional earnings. And as technological advances accelerate and our economy grows increasingly sophisticated, a college education will become even more important.
September 19, 2016
Increased faculty diversity has long been a goal of many colleges and universities. But a number of institutions have recently put their money where their mouths are, so to speak, launching expensive initiatives aimed at making their faculties more representative of their respective student bodies and the U.S. population. And while these initiatives are comprehensive, targeting multiple potential points of entry into -- and exit from -- the faculty candidate pool, a good portion of the funds are reserved for recruiting underrepresented minorities already working in academe or new Ph.D.s.
August 22, 2016
Although the American public is often told that a college education will consign them to six figures of debt and diminished financial prospects, the truth is that 36% of public four-year university graduates complete their degrees without any debt, the average debt among borrowers is $25,500, and less than 2% graduate with more than $60,000 in debt. Never mind that a bachelor’s degree adds up to $1 million to a worker’s lifetime earnings. Even some college, particularly a two-year degree, adds to lifetime earnings. Nearly 500 public universities have pledged to collectively increase the number of Americans earning a degree and share best practices that help to move the needle. Nearly 500 public universities have pledged to collectively increase the number of Americans earning a degree and share best practices that help to move the needle. Many institutions are using predictive analytics and Web-based advising to help students chart a clear path to graduation. Some are providing retention micro-grants to low-income students – who are often in their senior year and on track to graduate, but at risk of dropping out because they are just a few hundred dollars short on tuition. Other institutions have proved that an advising session at the beginning of a student’s senior year can appreciably increase their chances of graduating.
August 8, 2016
The rigorous, evidence-based approaches used in research should be applied to increasing diversity in science, according to three higher education organizations. The Association of Public & Land-grant Universities, the Coalition of Urban Serving Universities, and the Association of American Medical Colleges studied the lack of diversity in the biomedical sciences.