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News & Media

APLU In The News

September 19, 2016
Increased faculty diversity has long been a goal of many colleges and universities. But a number of institutions have recently put their money where their mouths are, so to speak, launching expensive initiatives aimed at making their faculties more representative of their respective student bodies and the U.S. population. And while these initiatives are comprehensive, targeting multiple potential points of entry into -- and exit from -- the faculty candidate pool, a good portion of the funds are reserved for recruiting underrepresented minorities already working in academe or new Ph.D.s.
August 22, 2016
Although the American public is often told that a college education will consign them to six figures of debt and diminished financial prospects, the truth is that 36% of public four-year university graduates complete their degrees without any debt, the average debt among borrowers is $25,500, and less than 2% graduate with more than $60,000 in debt. Never mind that a bachelor’s degree adds up to $1 million to a worker’s lifetime earnings. Even some college, particularly a two-year degree, adds to lifetime earnings. Nearly 500 public universities have pledged to collectively increase the number of Americans earning a degree and share best practices that help to move the needle. Nearly 500 public universities have pledged to collectively increase the number of Americans earning a degree and share best practices that help to move the needle. Many institutions are using predictive analytics and Web-based advising to help students chart a clear path to graduation. Some are providing retention micro-grants to low-income students – who are often in their senior year and on track to graduate, but at risk of dropping out because they are just a few hundred dollars short on tuition. Other institutions have proved that an advising session at the beginning of a student’s senior year can appreciably increase their chances of graduating.
August 8, 2016
The rigorous, evidence-based approaches used in research should be applied to increasing diversity in science, according to three higher education organizations. The Association of Public & Land-grant Universities, the Coalition of Urban Serving Universities, and the Association of American Medical Colleges studied the lack of diversity in the biomedical sciences.
July 29, 2016
Universities should evaluate their graduate programs in science and technology for ways to reduce "stereotype threat," in which female and minority students may feel less able to succeed academically even if in fact they can do so, says a report issued Thursday. The report examines steps colleges and universities may take to increase the diversity of the biomedical research workforce. The report also recommends that colleges and universities use holistic review -- in which applicants are considered individually without relying on cutoff scores or formulas of grades and test scores -- in doctoral admissions in science and technology fields.
July 29, 2016
Over the next five years, underrepresented student enrollment in postsecondary education is projected to climb 25 percent. But will the biomedical sciences and STEM workforce experience the same demographic shift? The Coalition of Urban Serving Universities, the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities and the Association of American Medical Colleges hope so: the group published a report with recommendations for ways to increase underrepresented student enrollment in biomedical sciences and STEM graduate programs.
June 24, 2016
The court's decision provides another example of how race can be used in admissions, but also once again shows a majority of the court thinks that diversity is important on college campuses, said Peter McPherson, president of the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities. "Today's decision is more than a narrow ruling on the role of race in college admissions," McPherson said. "It is a reaffirmation of the principle that the United States is a tapestry of diversity that flourishes when its people engage in the joint pursuit of new knowledge and the collective act of civic engagement."
March 14, 2016
Nine public urban research universities were awarded a total of $450,000 to launch or expand pilot “micro-grant” programs meant to prevent low-income college students who are close to graduation from dropping out, the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) and the Coalition of Urban Serving Universities (USU) announced Monday.
February 23, 2016
When students are short on funds for tuition but otherwise on track to graduate, colleges and universities should provide “completion grants” to help make sure the students finish school instead of dropping out. That is the major thrust behind a new report released Monday and meant to highlight the best ways to identify and assist students for whom a lack of cash is the only thing that stands in between the students and earning a degree.
February 23, 2016
Oregon's seven public universities want more state money to help undergraduate students who are on the verge of graduation but face money woes stay in school. Higher education leaders are asking for $15 million from the Legislature during February's short session to help students who otherwise might drop out stay in school and finish their degrees, a request officials don't expect to receive with competing requests and a rapidly approaching legislative deadline.
February 22, 2016
Even modest financial hardships can often derail students who are nearing graduation. That’s why some colleges give small awards known as completion grants to low-income students who are well on their way to earning a degree. A just-in-time grant of even a few hundred dollars can keep many recipients from dropping out, according to a report released on Monday by the Coalition of Urban-Serving Universities and the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities. The report, "Foiling the Dropout Trap," describes how 10 colleges are using similar aid strategies to help students overcome financial shortfalls and stay enrolled.