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News & Media

APLU In The News

February 22, 2016
Even modest financial hardships can often derail students who are nearing graduation. That’s why some colleges give small awards known as completion grants to low-income students who are well on their way to earning a degree. A just-in-time grant of even a few hundred dollars can keep many recipients from dropping out, according to a report released on Monday by the Coalition of Urban-Serving Universities and the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities. The report, "Foiling the Dropout Trap," describes how 10 colleges are using similar aid strategies to help students overcome financial shortfalls and stay enrolled.
February 22, 2016
A small amount of financial aid, even $300, can go a long way toward helping a student graduate. Emergency aid or microgrants from colleges can be used to cover a last tuition bill or even to help pay for a financial emergency, like fixing a car or visiting a sick relative. Microgrants aren’t new. But a growing number of colleges -- both community colleges and four-year institutions -- have data to prove that this form of institutional aid improves student retention and can even save a college money by preventing dropouts.
February 22, 2016
A new report from the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities encourages schools to use predictive analytics to identify at-risk students and continue to track their progress after they’ve received grants. The suggestions are a part of guidelines for schools interested in using small grants to improve retention and completion.
December 11, 2015
Advocates for public colleges know a degree has value beyond increased wages for their graduates. Now they are trying to convince everyone else. How to make that argument is the theme here at the annual conference of higher-education lobbyists representing public two- and four-year colleges — members of the American Association of Community Colleges, the American Association of State Colleges and Universities, and the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities. Members of the Council for Advancement and Support of Education also attended.
November 17, 2015
As public universities work to expand the number of students who attend college, a primary purpose of our institutions is to provide access to a quality higher education for all — regardless of means, background, race, gender, religion or sexual orientation.
September 18, 2015
In the run-up to the first day of classes each year, students and families are inundated with higher education statistics and often left wondering what information really matters or even which facts and figures to trust. With college access and affordability already emerging as central issues in the 2016 election cycle, the year ahead promises even more confusion than usual.
August 10, 2015
The U.S. Senate last week unanimously approved a resolution commemorating the 125th university of the Second Morrill Act that led to the creation of 19 historically black land-grant universities. The resolution celebrates that 1890 law and designates August 30 as “1890 Land-Grant Institutions Quasquicentennial Recognition Day.”
June 26, 2015
Historically black colleges -- public and private -- were created amid an era of overt discrimination and hostility to their mission. A new book traces how they responded to those challenges, typically without the financing enjoyed by other institutions, as well as to challenges that followed the theoretical end of Jim Crow. In the Face of Inequality: How Black Colleges Adapt (State University of New York Press) is by Melissa E. Wooten, assistant professor of sociology at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. She responded via email to questions about the book.
February 28, 2015
By Danielle Douglas-Gabriel
Cleveland State University made a proposition to its students two years ago: Take a full course load of 30 credits a year and get $200 off tuition and a $200 book stipend. Only 32 percent of its undergraduates finished a degree within six years, if at all. Hundreds of students were slipping through the cracks as the cost of college went up and up — and they took on thousands of dollars more in debt.
February 19, 2015
By Michael Stratford
From the moment President Obama called for a federal college ratings system some 18 months ago, colleges and universities have criticized the idea and lobbied against it.