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News & Media

Member Spotlights

University of Minnesota
Combating Addiction
Substance abuse affects 24 million Americans, and the goals of controlling chronic pain without causing addiction and preventing relapse have proved elusive. The University of Minnesota is identifying the root causes of relapse and creating better painkillers to end addiction. “One of the things we were interested in is: how does the brain recover when people stop using drugs?” says Kelvin Lim, professor of psychiatry at the University of Minnesota. Learning to predict who has the highest risk of relapse will help focus prevention efforts.
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California State University, Fullerton
Discovering Gravitational Waves
Cal State Fullerton physicist Geoffrey Lovelace is part of the CSUF faculty-student science team that contributed to the breakthrough discovery of gravitational waves, announced one year ago on Feb. 11, 2016 — a century after Einstein predicted their existence in his general theory of relativity. Lovelace and his team of student researchers developed computer simulations and visualizations to better predict the sources of gravitational waves, such as colliding black holes or a black hole tearing apart a neutron star. A second gravitational-wave detection was announced in June.
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Clemson University
The Art of Climate Change
With a heavy mug of coffee in one hand, Todd Anderson moves through his personal studio like a chef moving through a four-star kitchen. Anderson, an assistant professor of art at Clemson University, is a printmaker, skilled at transferring beauty and wonder from landscapes onto paper to share his experiences with the public. “I think we all understand that the world is changing in sweeping and dramatic ways,” Anderson says, his voice quiet and earnest. “My belief is that those places need to be seen, they need to be experienced and they need to be creatively documented.”
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University of Nevada, Reno
Advancing Lab Safety
The Environmental Health & Safety department, part of Research & Innovation at the University of Nevada, Reno, is one of the first in the nation to provide a campus lab space dedicated solely to safety training. In the past, safety training has been conducted online and through lecture, but the addition of the new Safety Training for Academic Research Lab or STAR Lab adds a more interactive and hands-on format. “The lectures we have been doing for the past years have been good training, but I always thought we could do better,” Ben Owens, assistant director of laboratory safety, said. “Some people do a lot better with hands-on kinds of training.”
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The University of Georgia
UGA and The Public Higher Education Movement
If our newly formed nation had to pick a Founding Father to transform higher education across America — and create a critical pillar of our fledgling democracy — Abraham Baldwin would have been an unlikely choice. The son of a Connecticut blacksmith, Baldwin was only 30 years old when he crafted one of the most groundbreaking documents in our nation's early history — the charter that established the University of Georgia as the birthplace of public higher education in America.
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University at Buffalo, SUNY
Detecting Autism Early, Via Smartphone
What if someone invented a smartphone app that could help detect autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in children as young as 2 years old? Could it lead to earlier detection and therefore better treatment? A study co-authored by a University at Buffalo undergraduate and presented at the IEEE Wireless Health conference at the National Institutes of Health last month could provide the answer.
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University of New Hampshire
Goodbye Waste, Hello Warmth
At the University of New Hampshire’s Organic Dairy Research Farm, UNH researchers have launched an innovative composting program that provides a high-quality compost product and captures the heat energy for use elsewhere on the farm. It’s part of University Professor John Aber’s work looking beyond the cows to see the farm as an agroecosystem. The project is supported by the USDA Program on Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) and the NH Agricultural Experiment Station, and the Joshua Nelson Energy Recovery Compost Facility was funded by an anonymous donor.
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University of Massachusetts Amherst
Clean Soil, Safe Food
Baoshan Xing, an environmental and soil chemist at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, is an expert in analyzing the chemical behaviors of soil and soil contaminants. As a most highly cited researcher, Xing works on issues of soil health and soil remediation. His groundbreaking research seeks to improve soil health to produce safer food.
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The University of Texas System
A Step Toward Comprehesive Data
In the first collaboration of its kind, The University of Texas System and the United States Census Bureau have signed a 10-year partnership agreement that will provide both organizations a more comprehensive picture of degree attainment and how it impacts labor market outcomes. These data will include earnings, region and industry of employment, migration patterns and career pathways for UT graduates from 2003 to present. The pilot research project will provide important insight for the LEHD program into the feasibility of future large-scale education research projects for the Census Bureau.
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Colorado State University
The Answer to Cancer May Be Walking Right Beside Us
Dr. Stephen Withrow, founding director of CSU’s world-renowned Flint Animal Cancer Center, has dedicated his life to studying cancers in dogs and other companion animals. And he’s not alone in the fight against this disease. His working relationship with Dr. Ross Wilkins — who treats human patients. Together, Withrow and Wilkins pioneered a limb-sparing technique allowing people with bone cancer to avoid amputation.
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Western Michigan University
Fostering Success
The mission of Western Michigan University's Center for Fostering Success is to improve college graduation and career achievement rates among youth and young adults aging out of the foster care system. The Center provides leadership that informs teaching, research, learning, and public service as it relates to the topic of foster care and higher education. The knowledge and innovations developed within the Center for Fostering Success is focused on action in applied settings.
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University of Arizona
Preventing Diabetes Before it Starts
A UA-led team is pilot-testing the diabetes prevention program EPIC (Encourage, Practice, and Inspire Change) Kids at two YMCA locations. The program is modeled after the successful and national YMCA’s Diabetes Prevention Program for adults, and is also aiming for national implementation. Each year in the US, more than 5,000 people under 20 are newly diagnosed with diabetes and about one in five children are obese.
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University of Kansas
Examining Polar Ice
Understanding the future of the world’s largest ice sheets, including Greenland and Antarctica, requires taking a look underneath the surface. Scientists are examining the Earth’s polar ice using key research and radar instruments from the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) at University of Kansas. The ice-penetrating radar from CReSIS discovered an ancient map of rivers below the surface of Greenland, helping scientists predict the ice’s future in the face of global warming.
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Indiana University
Saving the Honeybee
For the past decade, beekeepers in the U.S. and Europe have been reporting annual bee and hive losses that are considerably higher than what would be considered normal or sustainable. The term "colony collapse disorder" was coined in 2006 for the unexplained phenomenon of dying bee colonies. At IU, the scientists working on this issue. A Ph.D. student in microbiology, Freddy Lee is part of a lab in the IU Bloomington College of Arts and Sciences’ Department of Biology asking questions that may relate to the global decline in honey bees.
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University of Florida
A Second Chance for Cisco
When the green sea turtle named Cisco Kid washed up on Hammock Beach in Palm Coast, it seemed his luck had run out. He was anemic, underweight, fighting a blood infection, stunned by the January cold, too weak to swim or eat. Tumors beneath his back flippers sapped his energy, robbing his blood supply and hindering his movement. One thing was in Cisco’s favor, though: He had come ashore just a few miles from the University of Florida’s Whitney Laboratory Sea Turtle Hospital in St. Augustine.
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Cleveland State University
An Antidote to Extremism
Cleveland State University is hosting "College and University Peacebuilding Approaches to Violent Extremism and Youth Recruitment." The conference will address how people, especially young people, are influenced by hate groups to plan and initiate acts of terrorism. In order to understand what the larger forces are that motivate people to take such extreme measures, we need to closely examine the social structures that lead these youth to join these organizations and the ideological beliefs that motivate them.
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The State University of New York System
Addressing A Teacher Shortage
State University of New York Chancellor Nancy L. Zimpher and State Education Department Commissioner MaryEllen Elia announced an historic partnership to address New York’s teaching shortage through the transformation of teacher preparation. According to the Advisory Council’s report, which is available online, New York’s need for teachers will grow by 5.8 percent by 2022, or an average of 1,700 teachers per year
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Sacramento State, University of California
Students Researching HIV Prevention
A grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) is helping Sacramento State students contribute to the fight against HIV. The grant recently was awarded to Professor Katherine McReynolds, and it will allow her to expand the student research team (two graduate students and six undergraduates) that is working on a new approach to prevent HIV and AIDS.
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West Virginia University
Uncovering A Scandal, Protecting the Planet
West Virginia University researchers uncovered an emissions cheating scandal that made headlines around the world, but the real story is how their work will create safer, healthier cities. “When I became an engineer 25 years ago, I never thought the general public would be interested in this kind of research,” said Dan Carder, who has been Director of WVU’s Center for Alternative Fuels, Engines and Emissions since 2010.
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University of California, Los Angeles
Turning Carbon Dioxide into Concrete
A team of interdisciplinary researchers at UCLA has been working on a unique solution that may help eliminate sources of greenhouse gases. Their plan would create a closed-loop process: capturing carbon from power plant smokestacks and using it to create a new building material that would be fabricated using 3D printers. “What this technology does is take something that we have viewed as a nuisance — carbon dioxide that’s emitted from smokestacks — and turn it into something valuable,” said J.R. DeShazo, professor of public policy at UCLA.
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Arizona State University
Improving Crop Performance with Biotechnology
An Arizona State University researcher has figured out a way to modify crops to use less water and fertilizer but grow more food, an exciting development as food security becomes a critical concern as the world’s population expands. Roberto Gaxiola, an associate professor with the School of Life Sciences, said his work also enhances a plant’s tolerance to various outside stresses, such as drought or climate change, other factors in feeding the more than seven billion people on the planet.
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The University of Alabama at Birmingham
Unearthing History — from Space
Often described as the modern day Indiana Jones, Parcak uses infrared imagery from satellites to uncover ancient archaeological sites. A pioneer of space archaeology, she has earned acclaim for being among the first to apply satellite imaging to locate archaeological sites in Egypt. A professor at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, where she founded the Laboratory for Global Observation, a TED Fellow, and National Geographic Fellow, Parcak gained international attention for satellite mapping all of Egypt and unearthing 17 potential unknown pyramids, 1,000 tombs and 3,100 settlements.
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University of California
How a matchmaking algorithm saved lives
Long before dating sites, a pair of economists delved into the question of matchmaking, and hit upon a formula with applications far beyond romance. Would you let an economist set you up on a date? In the 1960s, researchers David Gale and Lloyd Shapley embarked upon federally-funded research to take up an unlikely subject: matchmaking. The real breakthrough came in 2004. That is when Roth developed the matchmaking principle to help transplant patients find donors.
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University of Maryland, College Park
UMD Researcher Studies Whether Bonding with Dogs Can Heal the Invisible Scars of War
The golden retriever puppy gazed up at Abel Rosas with adoring eyes, then tried to clamber into his lap. It was 2008, two wars were boiling in the Middle East, and he belonged over there with his fellow infantrymen hunting terrorists. Not playing with a dog in a California post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) treatment center.
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University of Wisconsin-Madison
Wisconsin Researchers Find Zika Virus in Colombia, Aim to Fight It
In October 2015, a team of researchers at the University of Wisconsin—Madison and Universidad de Sucre in Colombia ran the first tests confirming the presence of Zika virus transmission in the South American country. In a study published today (Jan 26, 2016) in the journal Emerging Infectious Diseases, the team documents a disease trajectory that started with nine positive patients and has now spread to more than 13,000 infected individuals in that country.
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Indiana University
IU scientists create 'nano-reactor'
Scientists at Indiana University have created a highly efficient biomaterial that catalyzes the formation of hydrogen -- one half of the "holy grail" of splitting H2O to make hydrogen and oxygen for fueling cheap and efficient cars that run on water.
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Oklahoma State University
Ready for Takeoff
Professor Jamey Jacob walks into his classroom and begins talking to the room of Oklahoma State University mechanical and aerospace engineering students. Jacob, a member of the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering faculty in the College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology, checks on the students’ progress with a project. Student teams are testing unmanned aerial vehicles to “deliver” a small package, or payload in industry jargon, and drop it on a target in a flight test.
Ready for Takeoff
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
On the Front Lines of El Niño
Some of the planet’s tiniest organisms are visible from space. Phytoplankton — single-celled, water-dwelling algae — are one-millionth of a meter in size and produce about half the oxygen we breathe. Millions of phytoplankton swirl around in jugs of seawater, collected just moments before from the Equatorial Pacific Ocean. “These vessels don’t have the equipment we usually use to do our work, so we had to improvise,” Adrian Marchetti, a UNC-Chapel Hill oceanographer, says with a laugh.
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University of Arizona
HiRISE Shows Signs of Liquid Water on Mars
New findings from NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter provide the strongest evidence yet that liquid water flows on present-day Mars. Using the orbiter’s High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE), managed at the University of Arizona, former undergraduate Lujendra Ojha first discovered possible water-related streaks on the red planet’s slopes in 2010.
HiRISE Shows Signs of Liquid Water on Mars
University of Washington
A Living Laboratory
Through the University of Washington's School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, Sarah Schooler, ’15, spent six weeks in the Alaskan bush, collecting the same data in the field she’d been studying in the classroom: salmon and the hungry habits of grizzly bears.
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University of Wisconsin-Madison
Fossil Trove Adds a New Limb to Human Family Tree
Working in a cave complex deep beneath South Africa’s Malmani dolomites, an international team of scientists has brought to light an unprecedented trove of hominin fossils — more than 1,500 well-preserved bones and teeth — representing the largest, most complete set of such remains found to date in Africa.
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Georgia Institute of Technology
Collaboration with CNN Investigates Use of UAVs for Newsgathering
The Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) and CNN have launched a joint research initiative to study the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for newsgathering. The project is now gaining momentum as researchers shift their focus from evaluating UAV equipment to developing potential protocols for safe operations.
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The University of New Mexico
The Lobo Experience
LoboScape is a visual installation welcoming travelers to Albuquerque. Projected onto a custom fabricated display, it uses the latest technology in visual arts to tell the story of The University of New Mexico and its people.
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University of Washington
The Big Picture
As he secures microscopic evidence from the world’s coldest places for his research on the Earth’s climate, University of Washington Ph.D. candidate Brad Markle also uses his artistic eye to capture photographs of some of the planet’s most desolate landscapes.
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Cornell University
FoodKeeper: The App to Reduce Food Waste
How many times have you gone into your pantry or refrigerator, only to find that what you were going to use in your meal was spoiled? The USDA, Cornell University and the Food Marketing Institute are solving that problem with their new app: the FoodKeeper.
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University of Arkansas, Fayetteville
Tumor Trap
Removing a cancerous tumor is only one-tenth of the job. Tracking cancerous cells to the points where they have metastasized and delivering immune-boosting substances to those locations takes a sleuth like David Zaharoff. In recent experiments, Zaharoff’s University of Arkansas Laboratory of Vaccine and Immunotherapy Delivery team has eradicated bladder tumors in mice
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The Pennsylvania State University
Superhero Window Washers
A group of window washers exchanged their cleaning tools for masks and capes and transformed into superheroes to brighten the day for these patients. The Penn State Hershey Children's Hospital, part of the Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, provides hope and healing to thousands of children and their families each year.
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Colorado State University
Speaking in Tongues
The remarkable work Colorado State University is doing to improve life for the hearing impaired is an example of how the university is developing practical solutions to complex challenges. CSU researchers have developed a new hearing device that bypasses the ear and instead uses a device in a persons mouth that allows the wearer to use their tongue to “hear.”
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University of Arizona
Asteroid-Bound to Protect Earth
The University of Arizona-led OSIRIS-REx mission will land a spacecraft on a near-Earth asteroid and return with samples for analysis. Scheduled for 2016, OSIRIS-REx will yield clues to our solar system’s origin and how to develop asteroid impact mitigation systems.
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University of Central Florida
Students Engineer 3D Printed Arms for Children, Change the World
There are millions of children in the world without limbs because of medical conditions or as a result of war. UCF engineering students are taught how to think beyond formulas to solve problems. That’s how some engineering students in their spare time began creating 3D arms for children for less than $350. They are giving children and their families hope. They are using their knowledge to solve problems. They are making a difference. They are UCF Knights.
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Miami University
Computing + Service Program to Help Increase the Number of Women in Electronics and Computing
NSF grant supports project connecting computer science and engineering course work to community-based problems
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New Mexico State University
Worldwide Mapping Mosquito DNA
New Mexico State University professor Immo Hansen and graduate student David Price are among 120 scientists from around the world who co-authored a paper about mosquito DNA that may help solve the mystery of why only some mosquito species evolved to transmit deadly diseases like malaria to humans.
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University of Maryland, College Park
Teaching Robots with YouTube
It might sound like science fiction, but University of Maryland scientists are developing robots that can teach themselves…from watching videos on YouTube.
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University of California, Davis
Newborn Foals Give Clues to Autism
UC Davis researchers discovered a new way to address a troubling disorder in newborn horses and are also exploring possible connections to childhood autism.
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University of Kansas
Going Green
Chlorella Vulgaris sounds like a Disney villainess, but it’s actually the star of a story that until recently sounded like a fairy tale: use algae to turn wastewater into clean fuel. But that’s exactly what University of Kansas faculty and student researchers are doing.
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The University of Georgia
Monarch Migration Study Finds a Common Culprit
A new study by UGA ecologists has found that sedentary winter-breeding butterflies are at increased risk of disease. But, for the monarchs at least, there may be a relatively simple solution.
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University of Connecticut
We Get It
Through initiatives such as Next Generation Connecticut (NGC), UConn is making unprecedented moves to unleash the solutions of tomorrow. Investments in research and economic development allow UConn to expand innovation and create breakthroughs in areas such as additive manufacturing, genomic medicine, and cybersecurity.
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