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News & Media

APLU In The News

February 14, 2020
As the presidential election campaign picks up, almost every top candidate has released a plan for higher education that addresses college affordability and student debt issues. But there’s only one candidate who’s already in the White House – Donald Trump – and this week he released his plan in the form of a proposed education budget for fiscal year 2021. If Congress were to approve it, some higher education experts say, low-income students would be so financially squeezed that college might be out of reach.
February 14, 2020
Calling for more reporting of foreign gifts than is widely practiced, the U.S. Department of Education’s letters to Harvard and Yale Universities this week signaled a ratcheting up of scrutiny of relations between American campuses and Chinese entities. In the two letters, each dated Tuesday, the department said Harvard and Yale may not have fully detailed their gifts and contracts with foreign entities as required by federal law. The cited provision requires universities to tell the Education Department about gifts from and contracts with foreign sources greater than $250,000.
February 11, 2020
President Trump on Monday called for a $5.6 billion, or 7.8 percent, cut in Department of Education funding and reductions for most core funders of academic research, but also proposed a nearly $900 million increase in career and technical education funding that U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos called “perhaps the largest increase in CTE ever.”
February 11, 2020
President Donald Trump’s proposed budget, released Monday, received praise and condemnation from those involved in higher education. The plan could particularly impact Georgia’s 22 technical colleges and its nine accredited historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs).
February 7, 2020
The Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) and Association for Institutional Research (AIR) are teaming up for a pilot that will provide data literacy training to APLU member campuses. The Data Literacy Institute, funded by a $670,000 grant from Ascendium Education Group, will offer coursework developed by AIR on the use of data to boost student success.
February 7, 2020
Oakland University has been selected to participate in a Data Literacy Institute project aimed at increasing the use of data to boost student success, including the number of graduates. "Data collection and analysis are key components of all student success initiatives," said Dr. Anne Hitt, associate provost and associate professor of biological sciences at OU. "We can use data to determine which student success tactics or programs are the most cost-effective in helping different student populations graduate on-time in their chosen major with minimal debt."
January 30, 2020
The night before Sadie Billings took her ACT exam, her stomach was in knots. She was so anxious she couldn’t sleep. She had been in the same position five times before. And although she had maintained a 4.0 high school grade point average, Billings — even after six tries — was never able to score above a 21, the cutoff for admission to the University of Missouri-Kansas City, her preferred school.
January 27, 2020
The next Ohio State president will have to do it all, higher education experts and community members say. The presidential search committee will welcome community input as their work begins, and will aim to have a list of semifinalists this summer. As Ohio State begins the search for its next president, higher education experts and local community leaders anticipate candidates will have to bring a lot to the table.
January 24, 2020
Chuck Staben has returned to his roots as a university professor, but it’s not where he wants to finish his career in higher education. Staben, who served as president of the University of Idaho from 2014-19 before the State Board of Education opted not to renew his contract, took a semester off and recently started teaching again as a professor of biological sciences at UI.
January 23, 2020
Pressured by her family to pursue medical school, Diana Choi found herself managing a Chipotle fast-food restaurant after sticking with her course at the University of California for less than a semester: “I don’t think I really wanted to go in the first place,” she admits. But now the twentysomething is better off than most people her age, with a full-time job at the software development company Techtonic – which, for no charge, gave her better training than her friends claim to have obtained in college.