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News & Media

APLU In The News

July 29, 2016
Over the next five years, underrepresented student enrollment in postsecondary education is projected to climb 25 percent. But will the biomedical sciences and STEM workforce experience the same demographic shift? The Coalition of Urban Serving Universities, the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities and the Association of American Medical Colleges hope so: the group published a report with recommendations for ways to increase underrepresented student enrollment in biomedical sciences and STEM graduate programs.
April 11, 2016
Math is a stumbling block for many students, and instruction may be part of the reason why. Introductory math courses that serve as gateways to majors in science, technology, engineering, and math can be stultifying bores, a presidential council has said, leaving students "with the impression that all STEM fields are dull and unimaginative." The council’s members have even suggested assigning faculty members from physics or computer science, for example, to teach the subject. Meanwhile, according to a recent critique, math curricula overemphasize abstract subjects like trigonometry and calculus over more-practical ones, unnecessarily demoralizing students and costing the nation human potential.
January 12, 2016
- The $1.5 trillion spending measure that just passed in Congress is particularly good news for the National Institutes of Health (NIH), which will see its budget increase by $2 billion, or 6 percent, the largest increase in over a decade. In recent years, the agency, and the research universities across the country that receive significant funding from it, have struggled with funding cuts and a failure to keep up with inflation that has hindered their work.
April 13, 2015
By Harold G. Levine & Michael W. Kirst
Now that the Common Core State Standards in English/language arts and mathematics have been adopted in much of the country, states are busy with their implementation. We have no doubt that, over time, these new K-12 standards will produce larger numbers of college-ready (and career-ready) students—as promised. College-bound freshmen can expect to head off to their colleges of choice ready for the deeply engaging learning experiences that await them.
December 4, 2014
By Michael Stratford
The Obama administration is once again gathering hundreds of college presidents here today for a second White House-run summit that will promote new commitments to help low-income students. Administration officials said they had won some 500 promises from college leaders, states, higher education associations, nonprofit organizations and other entities.
December 4, 2014
By Nick Anderson
Higher-education leaders from across the country are pledging to take steps to widen college opportunity and help more students finish degrees, an initiative President Obama will promote at a gathering in Washington on Thursday. The event will build on a summit Obama hosted in January at which he gathered similar commitments for college access from more than 100 colleges and 40 related organizations.
November 12, 2014
By Stephen Sawchuk
Even in higher education, where knowledge-sharing is prized, institutions have a tendency to take a protective approach to adapting to change. But what if colleges' and universities' collective expertise in a particular program area were harnessed toward meeting a common challenge? That's essentially the thinking behind an unusual cross-institution partnership now working to improve the preparation of middle and high school math teachers for the changes wrought by the Common Core State Standards for mathematics. The Mathematics Teacher Education Partnership, or MTEP, a project of the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities.