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News & Media

APLU In The News

August 25, 2021
Powered by Publics is a multifaceted effort begun in 2019 by the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities to produce hundreds of thousands of new college graduates by reducing gaps in completion rates by race, ethnicity, income, and first-generation status. As part of that project, APLU is tracking not only enrollments of Pell-eligible students at 125 participating colleges, but also other metrics such as retention and graduation, all broken down by demographics.
May 6, 2021
The DFW rate — the share of students who receive a grade of D or F or withdraw — in gateway courses has emerged as an important metric. DFW rates are correlated with progress to graduation. They can also be an important gauge of equity: In general, DFW rates are higher for first-generation students, students from underrepresented minority groups, and men than for their classmates. Both trends come through in this recent look at DFW rates for a set of common high-enrollment gateway courses compiled by a group of Big Ten universities working together on a project for the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities.
April 26, 2021
Learotha Williams Jr., a professor at Tennessee State University, witnessed how badly his institution needed funding when the campus was struck by lightning two years ago. The lightning damaged underground wires when it hit a central circuit in the campus’s aged electrical system. Disruptive power outages followed for weeks at the historically Black land-grant university. “Our infrastructure shouldn’t have been to a point where a lightning strike can shut down the school, not in the 21st century,” said Williams, an associate professor of African American and public history.
April 16, 2021
Two studies released over the past year, including one conducted by the Temple University-based Hope Center for College Community and Justice, show that 60% of students are struggling with food and housing insecurity. In its Food Insecurity at Urban Universities: Perspectives During the Pandemic report, the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) and Coalition of Urban Serving Universities (USU), suggest potential strategies institutions can take to help in the fight against food insecurity food hunger.
March 29, 2021
The Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) and the Coalition of Urban Serving Universities (USU) have released a report examining the pandemic’s significant impact on food insecurity among college students. The report, “Food Insecurity at Urban Universities: Perspectives During the COVID-19 Pandemic,” also outlines steps institutions can take to more effectively address food insecurity.
March 29, 2021
Mentors and “champions” can help elevate more women and minorities to positions of authority, according to The University of Texas at El Paso’s President Heather Wilson, who was a panelist on a virtual Women’s History Month webinar on Tuesday, March 23, 2021.
March 26, 2021
College lobby groups launched a campaign on Thursday for lawmakers to double the total value of grants to low-income students. Pell Grants once covered two-thirds of the total cost of a four-year college, but rising college costs have eroded the value of the grant. The maximum Pell award—$6,345 this academic year—covers less than a third of the cost of the typical four-year school.
March 26, 2021
As part of the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities’ (APLU) Powered by Publics: Scaling Student Success initiative, Texas Tech University is among nearly 125 institutions that have joined together to improve college access, advance equity and increase college degrees awarded.
January 28, 2021
“This will go down in the history of the University as one of the most challenging times that we’ve had,” said South Dakota State University President Barry H. Dunn in a recent interview with The Brookings Register.
January 21, 2021
The pandemic presented an enormous financial challenge for colleges and universities this past fall as they reopened online or in person. Institutions large and small had to cough up money for expenses related to COVID-19 testing, personal protective equipment and online learning resources. At the same time, they were bleeding tuition, housing and auxiliary services revenue.