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Policy & Advocacy

The President's Budget Request

Each year, the U.S. budget process begins when the President submits a budget request to Congress. The request, along with supporting documents, provides spending and policy proposals on how the administration would like Congress to support programs within federal agencies for the upcoming fiscal year through the annual appropriations process. Congress must ultimately appropriate funds for all discretionary programs.

FY2021

The White House released a budget request to Congress on February 10, 2020. The President’s Budget Request (PBR), A Budget for America's Future, includes significant cuts to and elimination of a number of higher education and research programs.

In reaction to the proposal, APLU President Peter McPherson released a statement.

APLU staff have compiled an Overview and Analysis of the President’s FY2021 Budget Request, with links to key documents and funding requests for programs of interest.

  • FY2020

    The White House released a budget request to Congress on March 11, 2019. The President’s Budget Request (PBR), A Budget for a Better America: Promises Kept. Taxpayers First, includes significant cuts to and elimination of a number of higher education and research programs.

    In reaction to the proposal, APLU President Peter McPherson released a statement.

    APLU staff have compiled an Overview and Analysis of the President’s FY2020 Budget Request, with links to key documents and funding requests for programs of interest.

  • FY2019

    The White House released a budget request to Congress on February 12, 2018. The President’s Budget Request (PBR), Efficient, Effective, Accountable: An American Budget, proposes $3 trillion in spending cuts over 10 years and projects a nearly three percent economic growth rate over the next decade. The PBR accounts for the recently enacted Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018, which increased the defense discretionary and non-defense discretionary (NDD) spending caps for both FY2018 and FY2019.

    In reaction to the proposal, APLU President Peter McPherson released a statement.

    APLU staff have compiled an Overview and Analysis of the President’s FY2019 Budget Request, with links to key documents and funding requests for programs of interest.

     

  • FY2018

    The White House released a budget request to Congress on May 23, 2017. The President’s Budget Request (PBR), America First: A Budget Blueprint to Make America Great Again, proposes a $54 billion increase for national defense discretionary budget authority and a reduction of $54 billion for nondefense discretionary programs.

    In reaction to the proposal, APLU President Peter McPherson released a statement.

    APLU staff have compiled an Overview and Analysis of the President’s FY2018 Budget Request, with links to key documents and funding requests for programs of interest.

     

  • FY2017

    The White House released a budget request to Congress on February 6, 2016. The President’s $4.15 trillion budget, while essentially flat when compared to the final FY2016 budget, proposes new investments in a number of areas, including research and higher education.

    In reaction to the proposal, APLU President Peter McPherson released a statement.

    APLU staff have compiled an Overview and Analysis of the President’s FY2017 Budget Request, with links to key documents and funding requests for programs of interest.

     

  • FY2016

    The White House released a budget request to Congress on February 2, 2015. The President’s Budget Request (PBR) proposes a $1.091 trillion increase in discretionary spending for FY2016, $74 billion above sequestration spending caps ($37 billion for defense, $37 billion for nondefense discretionary).

    In reaction to the proposal, APLU President Peter McPherson released a statement.

    APLU staff have compiled an Overview and Analysis of the President’s FY2016 Budget Request, with links to key documents and funding requests for programs of interest.