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News & Media

APLU In The News

August 19, 2019
More than a decade ago, Chinese physicist Pan Jian-Wei returned home from Europe to help oversee research into some of the most important technology of the 21st century. At a conference in Shanghai this summer, Pan and his team offered a rare peek at the work he described as a “revolution.” They spoke of the hacking-resistant communications networks they are building across China, the sensors they are designing to see through smog and around corners, and the prototype computers that may someday smash the computational power of any existing machine.
August 13, 2019
Monitoring Chinese scholars in the United States could “trample on individual rights” and impede scientific research, a group of prominent higher-education associations said in a statement released on Monday. The statement, published by the PEN America, a free-speech nonprofit organization, is the latest signal that advocates for American research universities are worried about higher education’s position in the cross hairs as political and economic tensions between the two countries heighten.
August 5, 2019
Over the past year, the federal government has expressed increasing concern about foreign interference in the university-based research that for decades has made America the world leader in scientific innovation. The federal intelligence agencies raising alarms have underlined the growing incidence and complexity of threats to universities, which take various forms and originate from an array of sources in cyberspace or from state-directed actors seeking critical information. Facing these concerns, research universities are working -- and all higher education institutions must work -- to bolster the security of their research without sacrificing the openness and collaboration that serves as a keystone of their research enterprises. To do this effectively, we need a strong partnership with federal intelligence and security agencies.
August 5, 2019
Naomi Schaefer Riley’s review of David Kirp’s “The College Dropout Scandal” (Bookshelf, July 30) shines a light on the need to increase college graduation rates. It isn’t easy. Students face a broad array of challenges in completing their degree. Sixty percent of today’s students are working-learners, one in four are parents and nearly 40% are low-income students receiving Pell Grants. They have a different set of needs than students did generations ago. Still, institutions must help students succeed. Years ago, institutions focused on increasing college access. But institutions recognize it isn’t enough to enroll more students; they must graduate them. Last year, 130 public universities and systems banded together to do exactly that. The schools are working within “transformation clusters” tackling different pieces of the student success puzzle. The effort, known as Powered by Publics, is aiming to increase college access, eliminate the achievement gap and award hundreds of thousands more degrees by 2025.
August 5, 2019
The Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place. This morning, the program focuses on UAlbany's Purple Pantry - a new on-campus food pantry that was enabled through a grant from the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities. Director of Student CARE Services Sally D’Alessandro and Associate Director of Off-Campus Student Services Luke Rumsey speak about the program.
July 25, 2019
The University of Louisville’s Anne Braden Institute for Social Justice Research will be recognized for its outstanding work and community partnership with Louisville's Fairness Campaign. The Braden Institute worked with the Fairness Campaign from 2015-2017 on a project aiming to shine light on Kentucky’s relatively unexplored LGBTQ history. As a result of this effort, U of L has received the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities' 2019 W. Kellogg Awards and will have the opportunity to compete for the Peter Magrath Award for Community Engagement.
July 16, 2019
A coalition of higher ed groups asked key Senate and House lawmakers in a letter Monday to make graduate students a priority in a reauthorization of the Higher Education Act. The letter went to Senator Lamar Alexander, the GOP chairman of the Senate education committee, and ranking Democratic senator Patty Murray as well as Representative Bobby Scott, chairman of the House education committee, and ranking Republican representative Virginia Foxx. It noted recent decisions by Congress that have made graduate education more expensive, including elimination of in-school interest subsidies for grad students and higher origination fees on Grad PLUS loans. Lawmakers also removed graduate eligibility for the Perkins Loan program before its expiration in 2017.
July 16, 2019
A laundry list of 32 higher education interests, student organizations and science societies this week went to bat for graduate and professional students, calling on the chairs and ranking members of the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions and the House Committee on Education and Labor to make graduate education a priority in reauthorization of the Higher Education Act.
July 10, 2019
The agency that accredits universities in Alaska is warning legislators that a 41 percent cut in state funding for the University of Alaska could lead to the loss of accreditation. Sonny Ramaswamy, president of the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities, issued the warning in a letter Sunday to state senators and representatives, and urged them to reconsider the funding cut. The cut, he wrote, poses a significant risk to the quality of education provided to UA students.
July 9, 2019
The clock began ticking on Monday for educators and students hoping to avert a potentially devastating financial blow to the University of Alaska system. Higher tuition, fewer students, crushing layoffs and program closures all loomed as frightening possibilities on Day 1 of the state’s special legislative session. The fiscal year had already begun, on July 1, and in a few months, a new crop of students would be arriving at the state’s far-flung campuses.